LinkedIn, the social network for professionals (think Facebook, but more serious), has launched a new service called InMaps that visualises your ‘connections’ to other people as a single network graph. I had a play with it earlier and here’s how my network of 163 people who I’ve connected with through work looks like:

Each colour corresponds to a different group within your network, which has been automatically identified based on individual affiliations – bigger dots represent people with more connections than others. The video below explains things a bit more.

I find it interesting to see how the segments within my network are quite distinctly split along geographical lines – Blue / Green represent colleagues on different projects I’ve worked on in the UK, Purple / Orange represent colleagues in Beijing and Shenzhen, with the small Yellow cluster being colleagues in Pakistan.

It would be great to see a tool like this which could do the same for all your online networks and then allow you to see the wider connections between them. I’m sure you’d be able to produce some pretty interesting metrics about individual levels of influence.

Comments

  1. Phil O'Brien says:

    Pretty visualisation – it’s interesting how it has split your groups along geographical lines. I don’t know if you realised, but InMaps is being algorithmically defined by the relationships between your connections (nothing else). It does not use time, companies, groups, zipcodes, etc to create this display. See quotes and video explaining from DJ Patil (LinkedIn Chief Scientist) at http://wp.me/pYnfH-7f (video shows him explaining on large piece of paper – much better than my MacBook screen)

    • David says:

      Thanks for the comment Phil – surprised to hear it’s all calculated algorithmically based on connections and nothing else.

      It was much more interesting to see the graphs of people with 1000’s of links in the video you linked to. I’ll have to work on expanding mine!

Leave a Reply