I woke with the sunrise in the curtainless tsuyado at Unpen-ji (雲辺寺 – 66) this morning around 5am. Nobody was around and it was great to wander the mountaintop temple with nothing but the sound of birds singing.

Path down from Unpen-ji

After gathering my belongings I set off down the mountain towards Daikō-ji (大興寺 – 67).

Rakan statues at Unpen-ji

The path took me past 500 grotesque rakan statues of people who have attained nirvana, somewhat appropriate since I was now entering Kawaga Prefecture.

Trail down from Unpen-ji

Onion plants

More appealing were the flowers and fields of onion plants which I’d never seen before being harvested and are really rather beautiful.

Daikō-ji gate

Bell rope at Daikō-ji

Daikō-ji temple

10km later I climbed the steep stone steps up to Daikō-ji where a large camphor tree is said to have been planted by Kūkai. The temple gives sweet manju bread to all walking pilgrims.

Roadside shrine

By now the sun was the hottest I’ve felt it during the whole trip so I put on some extra sunscreen. Unfortunately part of my sedge hat broke last week which means I haven’t been able to use it for protection and got a bit sunburnt.

Back on the road, I reached a crossing where a group of tiny children and their teachers were waiting. They all shouted “konnichiwa” in unison which was very cute and made me smile.

Kannon-ji

After another 9km I reached Jinne-in (神恵院 – 68) and Kannon-ji (観音寺 – 69) around 1pm. They were placed together during the separation of Shintoism and Buddhism and share the same temple office.

Three stone Buddha's at Jinne-in

In front of the temples was a small restaurant where I stopped for an ice cream and enjoyed the air conditioning for a while.

Old houses near temples 68/69

A nice row of old houses lined the lane leading to the main road but it wasn’t clear if they were inhabited anymore.

Statue at Motoyama-ji

Continuing east 5km, Motoyama-ji (本山寺 – 70) was undergoing some major restoration on its enormous pagoda which was entirely under wraps unfortunately.

Running child

Since it was already 2.30pm and I had another 12km to go I didn’t linger long and was soon back out in the scorching sun.

Takase henro hut (53)

Henro hut of the day has to go to Takase (53) which despite being right next to a busy road is really well maintained and by all the photos inside looks pretty popular.

A little further on I stopped at a Lawson’s to offload my rubbish like a well-behaved hobo. While I was doing this a lady came out and handed me an ice-cold bottle of lemonade. She stopped just long enough to tell me that she once completed the pilgrimage herself before speeding off in her car. It was the perfect gift on a hot day!

Sign to Iyadani temple

Mountains over fields

The rest of the route today followed backroads leading towards Iyadani-ji (弥谷寺 – 71) and the only people I saw were farmers in their fields burning piles of dried grass.

Henro foot bath

On the way up Mount Iyadani-san someone had set up a makeshift foot spa. I would have stopped but since it was already 5pm and I was so close to my destination I gave it a miss.

View from Fureai Park Min

Fureai Park Mino is a nice onsen resort which I’d booked to stay overnight. On check-in, the staff were a little over-eager to explain everything to this clearly naive foreigner which was a bit grating but I was too tired to say anything.

Tomorrow I have another day of temple hopping which is more or less the case up to temple 88 so apologies in advance if things get a little repetitive.

Information

Distance walked: 38 km / 51,000 steps
Temples visited: 67–70
Overnight lodgings: Furei Park Mino (ふれあいパークみの) – Onsen

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Comments

  1. Elly says:

    Wow David, 36 km in this heat from 66 till 71! You must be a strong, fit young man (I still wonder how old you are and how you look: Picture please?).
    This route took me 3 days on my first henro in the Golden Week in May 2013!

    But last time in November 2015 I could walk up 66 easy and stay in the tsuyado there: very cold! Next morning down to 67 it was snowing!

    • David says:

      Wow, being there in the snow must have been a very special experience. How did you survive overnight with no heating?!

      • Elly says:

        Yes it was very special. I was completeIy alone there on the top of Unpenji. After 5. 00 hours everyone who works there has gone. I carry a warm sleeping bag (till minus 10) and a Exped airmatrass. On the tatami it was OK with the 2 extra blankets there, I put 1 under the matrass. And I kept all my clothes on! I slept very well 💤😴

  2. Margaret says:

    Love the photos of the blue hydrangeas and white onions! You are doing really really well David – you made it over the high peaks and now have lots of temples ahead on the ‘home straight’

  3. Sarah says:

    Hope the heat hasn’t been too exhausting. We’ve had some lovely sunny weather here in the past few days. Loving the photos and updates every day 🙂

  4. Mo says:

    Loving the updates, you hobo! Are you going to do the henro twice? Or “just” stop at #1? 🙂

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